Breakfast in Paris

by Parisgirl on January 17, 2007

by Parisgirl | January 17th, 2007  

Breakfast used to be café au lait, hot chocolate or tea with buttered and toasted baguettes sliced in
half (called tartines on occasion). Fancy breakfast included a croissant along with the toasted baguette.

Nowadays, the Anglo breakfast has made inroads in Paris. You’re not likely to see beans served with your eggs, but it is much more common these days to find a ‘ petit dejeuner complet’ which might included – orange juice, a slice of grilled ham, and either two eggs sunnyside or an omelette plus the traditional grilled baguette and croissant. This is the typical breakfast nowadays at Ocean café located directly across from the Gare Montparnasse on Rue du Départ. It costs app 10 Euros. You can start your day with a hefty breakfast and catch a snack at one of the museum cafes or one of the park cafes (i.e. Tuilleries or Jardin du Luxembourg) for example. Some hotels include a light continental breakfast with their room rate, although in Paris, the majority tend to charge extra for breakfast. You may prefer to breakfast in one of the cafes where you might have a better view of street activity than the from your hotel lobby. (that being said, the breakfast looks pretty nice in the photo of Hotel Moderne’s offerings

http://www.paris-modern-hotel.com/modern-hotel-french/Hotel04-Hotel-Paris-Modern.htm

04-hotel-paris-modern.jpg

I hope some of these tips regarding restaurants will come in handy for you. Like every facet of Paris living, the possibilities for eating out in Paris are constantly changing – you can find tons of guidebooks to dining in Paris. Personally, I like using the guidebook Paris Pas Cher because I know that the authors are always looking for something that every French person appreciates a great little restaurant that won’t break the budget.
Le Figaro newspaper also will tell you what the hottest new restaurants are in town – but sometimes it’s more fun to find your own place. Take the time to look at the menu usually posted in the restaurant window and take some time to look at the people who may already be seated – would you like to invite them to have dinner with you? Maybe that’s a good way to decide if the restaurant is a place where you would feel relaxed and at home. Happy eats in Paris!

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